An analysis of gender roles in the odyssey by homer

Designing a mythology game provides students with an ideal opportunity to put their creative imaginations to work. Allow them to use their expertise and enthusiasm to create a board game based on the famous adventures of the Greek heros and heroines.

An analysis of gender roles in the odyssey by homer

Themes The Damaged Psyche of Humanity Like many modernist writers, Eliot wanted his poetry to express the fragile psychological state of humanity in the twentieth century. The passing of Victorian ideals and the trauma of World War I challenged cultural notions of masculine identity, causing artists to question the romantic literary ideal of a visionary-poet capable of changing the world through verse.

Modernist writers wanted to capture their transformed world, which they perceived as fractured, alienated, and denigrated. Europe lost an entire generation of young men to the horrors of the so-called Great War, causing a general crisis of masculinity as survivors struggled to find their place in a radically altered society.

Eliot saw society as paralyzed and wounded, and he imagined that culture was crumbling and dissolving. Eliot also argued that the literary past must be integrated into contemporary poetry.

But the poet must guard against excessive academic knowledge and distill only the most essential bits of the past into a poem, thereby enlightening readers. The Waste Land juxtaposes fragments of various elements of literary and mythic traditions with scenes and sounds from modern life.

The effect of this poetic collage is both a reinterpretation of canonical texts and a historical context for his examination of society and humanity. In the repressive Victorian era of the nineteenth century, women were confined to the domestic sphere, sexuality was not discussed or publicly explored, and a puritanical atmosphere dictated most social interactions.

World War I, from tofurther transformed society, as people felt both increasingly alienated from one another and empowered to break social mores. English women began agitating in earnest for the right to vote inand the flappers of the Jazz Age began smoking and drinking alcohol in public.

Women were allowed to attend school, and women who could afford it continued their education at those universities that began accepting women in the early twentieth century. Modernist writers created gay and lesbian characters and re-imagined masculinity and femininity as characteristics people could assume or shrug off rather than as absolute identities dictated by society.

Eliot simultaneously lauded the end of the Victorian era and expressed concern about the freedoms inherent in the modern age. The latter portrays rape, prostitution, a conversation about abortion, and other incidences of nonreproductive sexuality.

With Tiresias, Eliot creates a character that embodies wholeness, represented by the two genders coming together in one body. Motifs Fragmentation Eliot used fragmentation in his poetry both to demonstrate the chaotic state of modern existence and to juxtapose literary texts against one another.

Practically every line in The Waste Land echoes an academic work or canonical literary text, and many lines also have long footnotes written by Eliot as an attempt to explain his references and to encourage his readers to educate themselves by delving deeper into his sources.

These echoes and references are fragments themselves, since Eliot includes only parts, rather than whole texts from the canon. Using these fragments, Eliot tries to highlight recurrent themes and images in the literary tradition, as well as to place his ideas about the contemporary state of humanity along the spectrum of history.

He filled his poems with references to both the obscure and the well known, thereby teaching his readers as he writes.

In his notes to The Waste Land, Eliot explains the crucial role played by religious symbols and myths.

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He drew heavily from ancient fertility rituals, in which the fertility of the land was linked to the health of the Fisher King, a wounded figure who could be healed through the sacrifice of an effigy.

The Fisher King is, in turn, linked to the Holy Grail legends, in which a knight quests to find the grail, the only object capable of healing the land. Ultimately, ritual fails as the tool for healing the wasteland, even as Eliot presents alternative religious possibilities, including Hindu chants, Buddhist speeches, and pagan ceremonies.

Infertility Eliot envisioned the modern world as a wasteland, in which neither the land nor the people could conceive.

In The Waste Land, various characters are sexually frustrated or dysfunctional, unable to cope with either reproductive or nonreproductive sexuality: World War I not only eradicated an entire generation of young men in Europe but also ruined the land.

Trench warfare and chemical weapons, the two primary methods by which the war was fought, decimated plant life, leaving behind detritus and carnage. Corpses salute the stars with their upraised hands, stiffened from rigor mortis.

Although water has the regenerative possibility of restoring life and fertility, it can also lead to drowning and death, as in the case of Phlebas the sailor from The Waste Land.

Traditionally, water can imply baptism, Christianity, and the figure of Jesus Christ, and Eliot draws upon these traditional meanings: Eliot thus cautions us to beware of simple solutions or cures, for what looks innocuous might turn out to be very dangerous.

Weston, for many of his symbols and images. Traditionally, the impotence or death of the Fisher King brought unhappiness and famine. Eliot saw the Fisher King as symbolic of humanity, robbed of its sexual potency in the modern world and connected to the meaninglessness of urban existence. But the Fisher King also stands in for Christ and other religious figures associated with divine resurrection and rebirth.

Christ manages to feed his multitude of followers by the Sea of Galilee with just a small amount of fish.

An analysis of gender roles in the odyssey by homer

Music and Singing Like most modernist writers, Eliot was interested in the divide between high and low culture, which he symbolized using music.Author: Homer Date: 9th or 8th century B.C. The authorship of The Odyssey (and The Iliad) is not known for sure; the epic poems were passed down through an oral tradition and Homer, a figure whose existence cannot be proven, is only the name the ancient Greeks themselves attached to the poems.

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The role of each gender within The Odyssey is made extremely evident, and on multiple occasions Homer makes reference to the expectations of each sex.

Throughout the epic, presentations of women are somewhat limited, unless they appear as mothers, servants, deities, seductresses, or a combination of these. Other essays and articles in the Literature Archives related to this topic include: Gender and Power in Lysistrata by Aristophanes • Character and Divine Influence in The Aeneid and Iliad • Fate and the Death of Turnus in Virgil’s Aeneid • The Themes of Furor and Flames in The Aeneid by Virgil • Masculinity and The Warrior Culture of The Iliad by Homer.

Read an in-depth analysis of Odysseus. Telemachus - Odysseus’s son. An infant when Odysseus left for Troy, Telemachus is about twenty at the beginning of the story. The Gods, and Zeus Especially, as Spectators in the Iliad - As spectators we are normally passive onlookers of the action taking place.

The only influence we can have over the outcome is by making the participants aware of our support by cheering, or of our anger and . Henceforth, the way male roles differ in The Odyssey and its adaptions accentuate the pivotal influence contextual values play in shaping characters and story patterns.

[1] O Brother, Where Art Thou? (17).

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